Archive for the ‘Naval Research Lab’ Tag

Paloma, Still Centered Over Cuba, Is Now a Tropical Storm

11-9-08-navy-hr

The image you see above shows Paloma at 2:15 EST today (Sunday, 11-9-2008).  It’s maximum sustained wind velocity was 60 mph at 10 AM but likely to be less now.  It may become a remnant low very soon.

FOR A MUCH ENLARGED VIEW, TWO INDEPENDENT LEFT CLICKS SHOULD WORK FOR YOU.

This is a high resolution visible image from the Naval Research Lab.  In spite of the fact that this photo was completed early in the afternoon, the low sun angle for this time of year provides a good view of the cumuliform cloud tops over the Bahamas; this is because the shadows the cloud tops cast give us a better view of their respective shapes.  Incidentally, the lowest sun angle for any given daylight hour for those of us in the “Lower 49” occurs on the first day of Winter, which is also the day with the shortest length of daylight (Winter Solstice).  It is necessary for me to exclude Alaska in that statement because there are parts of that state which, during the Winter, experience days with no daylight.

TO SEE ALL POST, MOST RECENT FIRST,

PLEASE CLICK ON THE BLOG TAB ABOVE.

Paloma – the Tropical Storm Has Developed

FOR THE GREATEST ENLARGEMENT,

APPLY TWO INDEPENDENT LEFT CLICKS WITH YOUR MOUSE.

11-6-08-paloma1

Tropical Storm Paloma formed last night from Tropical Depression # 17.  Currently its maximum sustained winds are estimated at 45 mph.  It is beginning to form an eyewall.  There has been no exceptional changes in the forecast path since my last posting.

A hurricane hunter mission is in the air now and information should be available around 1:00 PM EST.

Above is a high-resolution image from the visible spectrum – completed 11:45 AM EST (about an hour ago if you are reading this at post time).

I enjoy these great images provided by the Naval Research Lab in Monterey, California.  For someone like myself, so very interested in clouds, they are so much more revealing than some of the fuzzy images we often see from other sources.

To view other postings in inverse order, simply click on the Blog button at the top of this page.

CARIBBEAN SYSTEM HAS MEDIUM POTENTIAL FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT.

TWO LEFT CLICKS WILL ENLARGE IMAGES A GREAT DEAL

According to the National Hurricane Center, the tropical wave in the Caribbean has a medium potential for tropical cyclone development.  For those of you who don’t understand that here is a brief explanation.

In order for a system to be cyclonic there must be a rotation of the wind around a low pressure center.  Presently there is no indication of a closed rotation in this otherwise impressive system.  A tropical wave (also called a tropical disturbance) becomes a tropical depression if rotation begins.  Ordinarily the rotation itself signals a maturing (growth) of the system.  Once rotation begins, the conservation of angular momentum kicks in such that as the wind spirals closer and closer to the center its velocity increases.  Tropical depressions can intensify into tropical storms (39-73 mph) and the latter can intensify into hurricanes (74 or more mph).  Here is the formal statement from the Hurricane Center:

================================================

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK

NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL

800 PM EDT SAT SEP 20 2008

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC…CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO…

1. A TROPICAL WAVE…ACCOMPANIED BY A SURFACE LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM OVER THE NORTHEASTERN CARIBBEAN SEA…IS PRODUCING WIDESPREAD CLOUDINESS AND SHOWERS OVER THE LESSER ANTILLES…AND ADJACENT CARIBBEAN AND ATLANTIC WATERS.  THIS SYSTEM IS SHOWING SIGNS OF ORGANIZATION…AND UPPER-LEVEL WINDS ARE EXPECTED TO BECOME A LITTLE MORE FAVORABLE

FOR DEVELOPMENT OVER THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS.  A TROPICAL

DEPRESSION COULD FORM DURING THIS TIME AS THE SYSTEM MOVES SLOWLY NORTHWESTWARD.  AN AIR FORCE RESERVE UNIT RECONNAISSANCE AIRCRAFT IS SCHEDULED TO INVESTIGATE THE SYSTEM ON SUNDAY…IF NECESSARY.  REGARDLESS OF DEVELOPMENT…LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL AND STRONG GUSTY WINDS WILL AFFECT MUCH OF THE LESSER ANTILLES…THE VIRGIN ISLANDS AND PUERTO RICO THROUGH SUNDAY.

================================================

On the infrared satellite image above from the U.S. Naval Research Lab, I have marked two islands that don’t need any more precipitation for a while due to recent tropical systems having dumped heavy (and deadly) loads upon them.  Flooding and mudslides are likely if this disturbance moves as expected, over the islands.  For the same reasons, Cuba also stands a risk of increased problems.

Please visit the rest of this web-log at https://cloudman23.wordpress.com/.  If you are interested in weather, there are some tutorials scattered about and more will be added in time.